National: Pauline Hanson’s ‘Racist’ Maiden Speech Condemned

Pauline Hanson’s maiden speech has caused furore over its ‘racist’ message.

During her first speech in parliament on September 14, Hanson called for a ban on building mosques, wearing the burqa, and Muslim immigration.

Below are some of the speech’s excerpts:

Muslims want to see sharia law introduced in Australia. This law is a totalitarian civil code which prescribes harsh feudal rules imposed on everything, firstly for Muslims, later for everyone. As long as Islam is considered a religion, sharia conflicts with our secular state.

Islam cannot have a significant presence in Australia if we are to live in an open, secular and cohesive society. Never before in Australia’s history have we seen civil unrest and terror associated with a so-called religion, or from followers of that faith. We have seen the destruction that it is causing around the world.

If we do not make changes now, there will be no hope in the future. Have no doubt that we will be living under sharia law and treated as second-class citizens with second-class rights if we keep heading down the path with the attitude, ‘She’ll be right, mate.’

Therefore, I call for stopping further Muslim immigration and banning the burqa, as they have done in many countries around the world.

The Greens parliament members walked out on the speech. “We walked out of the chamber during Pauline Hanson’s first speech to this Parliament because we stand with the millions of Australians who choose to walk away from negativity and racism,” said Greens leader, Richard di Natale in a statement.

“We are sending a very strong message that we stand with the majority of Australians who value cultural diversity, respect, and tolerance.”

“I think it’s just ugly hate speech,” said musician Jimmy Barnes on ABC’s Q&A last night, describing Hanson’s maiden speech as “fanning the flames of extremism”.

A number of media outlets, such as ABC and SBS, have also pointed out the factual errors in Hanson’s speech, with the Courier-Mail saying the speech was “more fiction than fact”.