National: One Nation Senator Denies Climate Change is Happening

One Nation senator Malcolm Roberts has claimed that the CSIRO’s climate change science had no “empirical proof”.

In his Monday press conference, Roberts released his 42-page report titled “On Climate, CSIRO Lacks Empirical Proof”, in which he wrote that the agency “relies on unscientific Australian and overseas manipulations of data that have fabricated warming temperatures”.

Roberts also published his letter to Dr Larry Marshall of the CSIRO, saying that climate policies is detrimental to “key industries” and people’s job security.

The report also criticised former Prime Minister Julia Gillard’s carbon tax policy and claimed that Great Barrier Reef is not “dying”.

“We have had complete failure of science in policies that has cost Australian taxpayers and citizens and Queensland residents billions of dollars and has cost lives,” said Roberts in the press conference.

Roberts said the CSIRO and weather bureau should face an independent inquiry over the lack of “empirical evidence” that human activity affects climate.

The CSIRO maintained its position in a statement: “CSIRO stands behind its peer-reviewed science on environment, climate and climate change.”

National: Barnaby Joyce Accuses ALP of Communism

Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce has accused the Labor party of “communism” in a speech at the National Farmers’ Federation Congress in Canberra.

Joyce said foreign ownership was a threat to patriotism, and that Labor’s policies, including native vegetation management, would result in “dispossession” and therefore communism.

“I thought about how Labor dispossess people of their private assets with tree-clearing guidelines – ‘vegetation management’ as it’s euphemistically called,” Joyce said.

“This essentially took away ownership from private individuals and gave it to the community. The dispossession of the individual for the community benefit, without the community paying for it.

“While I was marking my 184th lamb that I’d just picked up, I thought, ‘there’s a word for this — it’s called communism’.”

Joyce closed his speech by repeating his statement on opposing foreign ownership of agricultural land. “It’s the whole essence of patriotism, the love of one’s country is best delivered when you own that country,” Joyce said.

“The love of one’s country is best delivered when you own that country. I may like your car but I love mine. Likewise, I find your house very interesting but I want to go home to mine … And believe me, there’s one thing that people are not keen to do and that is die for a rented country.”

When asked whether his speech was too harsh given the presence of Chinese ambassador Cheng Jingye in the congress, Joyce told ABC, “China more than anybody is moving towards a market economy. Ever since (former leader) Deng Xiaoping decided that was the direction they should go, they’ve been exceptionally good at it and private ownership fundamentally underpins your attachment to an asset.

“I love the fact that if my daughters want to, they can go on to the farm that I bought – that’s my aspiration, that’s what makes Australia a great place, and it does build up this idea of patriotism – the love of the earth that you stand on because your indelible connection to it and I’m sure a lot of indigenous Australians would agree with me as well.”

Labor’s Shadow Minister for Agriculture, Joel Fitzgibbon said Joyce’s populist statement on foreign ownership “is a zero sum game”.

“Overcoming those challenges and capitalizing on the opportunities will take new thinking, hard work and co-operation,” Fitzgibbon said.

“And it will require all of us to spend more time talking in positive rather than in negative tones.”

International: 1960s Activist and Politician Tom Hayden Dies

American social activist and politician Tom Hayden has died at the age of 76 in California following stroke-related complications.

Hayden was a key figure for the anti-war and civil rights movements in the 1960s. He was the founding member of Students for a Democratic Society and the main author of the group’s 1962 manifesto Port Huron Statement.

Hayden was one of the organizers of the 1968 anti-war protests at the Democratic National Convention, for which he was convicted on incitement and conspiracy charges. He was also involved in Martin Luther King’s civil disobedience campaign against racial segregation.

Hayden won the 1982 election to California state Assembly after a number of losses and went on to win a state Senate seat in 1992. In total, Hayden served for 18 years.

Hayden has written and edited 20 books on politics and inequality and has taught at UCLA, Scripps College, Pitzer College, Occidental College, and the Harvard Institute of Politics.

National: Solicitor-General Justin Gleeson Resigns Amid Conflict with George Brandis

Solicitor-General Justin Gleeson has resigned after an open conflict with Attorney-General George Brandis, following the latter’s decision to restrict parliament members’ access to the former’s legal advice.

As Junkee’s Osman Faruqi explained, Brandis’s legally-binding decision in May to restrict access meant that “no minister, including the Prime Minister, could seek legal advice [from Gleeson] without going through Brandis”.

Gleeson said he had been left out of the discussions surrounding public matters such as anti-terror legislation and same-sex marriage. Brandis has been reported seeking advice on same-sex marriage from former Solicitor-General David Bennett after rejecting Gleeson’s advice.

The outgoing chief legal officer also said his resignation does not indicate a backtrack from “any position I have taken in relation to matters of controversy between us”.

“It is not Mr Gleeson who should have resigned today – it is Senator Brandis,” Shadow Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus said. “The Commonwealth has lost from its service a great legal mind and one of the most experienced constitutional lawyers in this country as its most senior legal adviser.”

“It’s imperative that we have somebody of absolute integrity [for the Solicitor-General role], it’s imperative that we have somebody who is not afraid to give advice which will be potentially distasteful to the government of the day,” Law Council of Australia president, Stuart Clark said.

“We had that person in Justin Gleeson.”

International: Thailand Dispels Concerns Following King’s Death

Thailand has reaffirmed that royal succession and election will not be a concern following the death of King Bhumibol Adulyadej.

The king died at the age of 88 and was the world’s longest-reigning monarch, having presided the country for 70 years.

Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn said he would delay the ascension to the throne to mourn his father with the people for an unspecified period. In the meantime, the head of the royal advisory council, Prem Tinsulanonda will stand in as regent.

“[The prince] said at this time everyone is sad, he is still sad, so every side should wait until we pass this sad time,” said Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha.

“When the religious ceremony and funeral have passed for a while, then it will be an appropriate time to proceed.”

The Bangkok Post newspaper also reported that the general election scheduled for next year will not be delayed.

“The government has reaffirmed its commitment to following the roadmap for general elections scheduled for late next year,” the newspaper said.

The government also stated that the economy and government will continue to work as normal.

National: NSW Premier Mike Baird Backflips on Greyhounds Racing Ban

Five greyhounds have been killed since last week, when NSW Premier Mike Baird backtracked on his decision to ban the racing.

Baird and deputy premier Troy Grant announced that a panel will report to the state government about reforming the sport and “providing the most stringent, safest racing environment to eliminate avoidable injury”.

Baird said that he and his government were “wrong” about the decision to close down the industry after three months stating that the ban was “the right thing to do”.

“I got it wrong, we got it wrong, the cabinet got it wrong and the government got it wrong,” Baird said.

Baird said his advisor on the industry closure, Dr John Keniry had said that “there is now a deep appetite for change, for reform in the industry… [the industry is] desperate to change.”

The decision to ban greyhound racing from July 1, 2017 was a result of special inquiry headed by Michael McHugh, which found that up to 68,000 greyhounds had been euthanised in the past 12 years due to slowness and incapability to continue competing.

Brenton Scott, chief executive of the NSW Greyhound Industry Racing Alliance said cases of track euthanasia “represents an extremely small 0.13 per cent of runner. However, the industry accepts that every possible step must be taken to avoid any track euthanasia going forward.”

Fairfax’s Sean Nicholls said the reversal is likely caused by oppositional media and industry campaign, as well as predictions that the Liberal Party might lose the November 12 Orange by-election.

Technology: BlackBerry to Stop Making Its Own Phones

BlackBerry has announced that it will stop making phones in order to focus on software development.

The production of handsets will be leveraged to a new, Indonesia-based joint venture called BB Merah Putih. This venture will be led by PT Tiphone, an affiliate of Indonesia’s largest carrier, Telkomsel.

Chief operating officer and general manager at BlackBerry, Ralph Pini said the decision enables the company to continue bringing BlackBerry devices to the market and develop “state-of-the-art security software for devices”.

“BlackBerry is no longer just about the smartphone, but the smart in the phone,” said BlackBerry CEO, John Chen. “Through this strategy, there will continue to be BlackBerry-branded devices in the market; when you see our logo it means security, from our class-leading enterprise software to devices secured by BlackBerry software.”

BlackBerry smartphones have long been overtaken by Apple and Samsung, with current market share of 0.1 per cent and recorded losses of $670 million in the last quarter.

BlackBerry was known as the inventor of smartphones, with the launch of BlackBerry 850 in 1999. It was popular among business executives and heads of state, with President Barack Obama as one of the world’s most prominent fans of the phone product.

International: Fox News’ Chinatown Segment Sparks Outrage

Fox News’ segment on Chinatown has attracted criticism for its “racist stereotyping” of Chinese American communities.

The “Watters’ World” is a regular segment hosted by Jesse Watters in The O’Reilly Factor. In an episode aired on October 3, Watters was shown going to Chinatown to ask the community’s political opinion following Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s statement on China.

Critics argue that Watters made fun of Chinese Americans’ culture and portrayed Chinese American citizens who are unable to speak English as politically ignorant for not being able to answer Watters’s questions. Critics also condemn Watters for asking a man if he knew karate (a Japanese martial art) and staging a mock fight in a taekwondo (Korean martial art) center that was followed by a clip of Bruce Lee (a Hong Kong-American man).

The video has received over 21,680 dislikes on Youtube, with one user commenting, “This video was a burning dumpster fire of racist stereotypes and lazy attempts at humor at the expense of Chinese Americans”.

Watters said on Twitter, “My man-on-the-street interviews are meant to be taken as tongue-in-cheek and I regret if anyone found offense.” Shanghaiist website called this tweet “non-apologizing”, while The Daily Show’s Ronny Chieng responded with a video showing his own interview in Chinatown and telling Watters, “If you’re gonna be racist, at least get your stereotypes right…”

More than 19,000 people have signed a petition calling on Fox News to issue an apology, cancel the “Watters’ World” segment and meet with representatives of Asian American community to address the on-air racism.

International: Clown Sightings Terrify the World

A significant number of clown sightings have been recorded around the world in the past couple of months.

The first sighting was reported in Greenville, South Carolina in late August. The New York Times reported witness statements that “people in clown makeup had been terrorizing both children and adults”. The phenomenon then spread to other states in the US, such as North Carolina, New Jersey and Ohio, as well as other countries including Canada and Australia. In the latter, clowns have been spotted in Brisbane, Ipswich, Wollongong, East and North Sydney, and more.

While most of the clowns were just roaming around, a number of reports state that some clowns were chasing people using tools such as knives or baseball bats or vandalizing private property, leading to police arrests. Clown Sightings Australia page on Facebook announced that some clowns were spotted throwing eggs at cars in Randwick.

Some theories about this clown ‘uprising’ have been put forward. Many believe it is part of a promotional stunt for upcoming horror film “It” (2017) which heavily features clowns. However, others think it is just another social media fad. Benjamin Radford, author of non-fiction book “Bad Clowns” told CNN, “The scary clown image is perfect for social media. It is custom-made to go viral.

“You have something that is both scary and funny. It’s this combination of horror and humor, laughter and fears… People see this scary clown narrative happening on the news, and they’re like, ‘Hey I want to be a part of this!'”

International: UN Continues Delivering Aid to Syrians After Attack

The United Nations said it is ready to continue delivering aid to Syria, only days after at least 18 trucks were hit by an airstrike, killing 20 people and triggering the suspension of the humanitarian relief operations.

“The preparation for these convoys has now resumed and we are ready to deliver aid to besieged and hard-to-reach areas as soon as possible,” the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) said in a statement on Wednesday, September 21.

“The United Nations continues to call for safe, unconditional, unimpeded and sustained access to all Syrians in need, wherever they are.”

The attack happened after Syria broke the ceasefire agreement due to US-led coalition attack on Syrian army camp. US officials blamed Russia for the airstrike, while Moscow rejected the claims that Russia or Syria carried out the attack, in keeping with the ceasefire obligations.

According to the UN, the attacked trucks were heading to rebel-held town Urem al-Kubra, west of Aleppo.

The UN OCHA’s emergency relief officer, Stephen O’Brien called the continuous conflicts between the countries “a stain on the world’s collective conscience”.

“it appears that we have moved – once again – into reverse gear,” said O’Brien in a statement. “Active conflict and insecurity, as well as numerous delays in getting the necessary approval, have been limiting factors in reaching people in need these past many weeks.

“We need all necessary action from the parties and their supporters to ensure safe, sustained, unhindered and unconditional access. And we need an immediate end to the sieges which still collectively punish hundreds of thousands of civilians mercilessly. Anything less than the full lifting of the sieges will never be enough and we cannot pretend otherwise.”