International: At Least 11 Killed in Saint Petersburg Explosion

At least 11 people were killed in an explosion in Saint Petersburg metro on Monday, with dozens injured.

The blast tore apart a train carriage which was travelling between two stations around 2.40 pm.

A second explosive device was found at a nearby station and defused by authorities. No groups have claimed responsibility for the explosion.

President Vladimir Putin said the cause of the explosion was not clear yet. “We will look at all possible causes, terrorism as well as common crime,” Putin said.

Russia’s Investigative Committee said while the investigation into the event was based on an assumption of terrorism, it was also considering other possibilities.

According to state media, the bomb contained a kilogram of TNT and was hidden in a fire extinguisher. Law enforcement agencies also confirmed that the bomb was filled with shrapnel.

All St Petersburg metro stations have been closed.

National: Health Groups Condemn Pauline Hanson’s Vaccination Statement

Health groups have demanded senator Pauline Hanson to retract her “ludicrous” and “dangerous” statement on Australia’s vaccination programs.

During an interview with ABC’s Insiders on Sunday, Hanson, leader of One Nation party, said that the government’s ‘no jab, no pay’ policy of withholding welfare payments for unvaccinated children is “dictatorship”, and that parents have “a right to investigate themselves” before vaccinating their children.

Experts from health groups have condemned the statement.

“I’m utterly appalled by Senator Hanson’s comments. She needs to realise that she’s a serious player in Australian politics now,” said Dr Michael Gannon, head of Australian Medical Association. “[With] 10 per cent of Australians indicating an intention to vote for One Nation, she can no longer make fringe statements that are dangerous to the health of the whole community.”

Director of Immunisation Foundation of Australia, Catherine Hughes said in an interview with SBS News that Hanson’s statement was “disappointing”.

“She shows a total lack of regard towards the health and safety of Australian children, and doesn’t seem to have an understanding of the value of preventative medicine,” Hughes said.

“By encouraging people to ‘do their own research’ on vaccination, she is insinuating parents have the resources and abilities to conduct better medical research than scientists and doctors. It’s a ludicrous thing to say.”

Hughes also added that Hanson’s previous comments on vaccination’s links with autism and other diseases were “misinformed and dangerous statements” that could influence parents’ decision.

Health director of Grattan Institute, Stephen Duckett told ABC Radio that Hanson has to “apologise and retract that statement”.

“Vaccines are safe. I cannot stress how angry it makes one feel that she is putting lives at risk,” said Duckett.

“If parents choose not to vaccinate their children, they are putting their children’s health at risk, and every other person’s children at risk too.”

Hanson has defended her statement, claiming it was a “personal opinion” which “has nothing to do” with politics. “I had my children vaccinated,” said Hanson. “I never told my children not to get their children vaccinated. All I’m saying is get your advice.”

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull re-emphasised the importance of vaccination. “Parents who choose not to vaccinate their children are putting their own children’s health at risk and they are putting the health of everybody else’s children at risk as well,” said Turnbull on Monday.

“So, that is why vaccination is so important. That is why we have our no-jab, no-pay policy. It has worked very well over the past year and we have seen 200,000 more children vaccinated as a result.”

International: Donald Trump Signs a Revised Travel Ban Order

US President Donald Trump has signed a newly revised travel ban order, exempting Iraqi nationals and US permanent residents from the prohibition to enter the country.

The new order, which takes effect starting March 16, will apply a 90-day visa halt on citizens of six Muslim-majority countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen. It also explicitly exempts US permanent residents and valid visa holders.

The new order comes after the controversies surrounding the original order, which was issued on January 27 and blocked by federal courts following protests and .

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said the order was required to provide “a needed pause” for US to review its relationship with travellers from “countries of concern”.

“We cannot compromise our nation’s security by allowing visitors entry when their own governments are unable or unwilling to provide the information we need to vet them responsibly, or when those governments actively support terrorism,” said Sessions.

The American Civil Liberties Union said it would try to block the new order in court, saying the latest revision still amounts to religious discrimination.

“President Trump has recommitted himself to religious discrimination, and he can expect continued disapproval from both the courts and the people,” said Omar Jadwat, ACLU’s Immigrant Rights Project director.

Democrats senator Bernie Sanders said the ban would instead jeopardise the safety of American citizens.

“This ban is a racist and anti-Islamic attempt to divide us up,” Sanders wrote in a statement. “This isn’t about keeping America safe. A president responsible for keeping our citizens safe would not hand over ideological ammunition to terrorists seeking new recruits to kill Americans.”

“A watered-down ban is still a ban,” said senator Chuck Schumer in a statement. “Despite the administration’s changes, this dangerous executive order makes us less safe, not more, it is mean-spirited, and un-American. It must be repealed.”

National: Plane Crashes near Essendon Airport

A plane containing five people has crashed into the Direct Factory Outlet near Essendon Airport in Melbourne.

Witnesses reported explosions and black smoke from the crash site. A government source said the Beechcraft airplane was a charter aircraft heading to King Island.

The plane crashed just before 9am today, a police spokesman confirmed. Police, paramedics and firefighters have arrived at the Essendon airway. Information on injuries and fatalities is not available yet.

Tullamarine Freeway is now closed between English Street and McNamara Avenue, and all motorists are advised to leave Tullamarine as soon as possible.

International: Mike Pence Pledges US Commitment to the EU

US Vice President Mike Pence said the country “remains committed” to the European Union in a visit to Brussels, following President Donald Trump’s vocal criticism of the organisation.

“It is my privilege on behalf of President Trump to express the strong commitment of the United States to continued cooperation and partnership with the European Union,” Pence told reporters.

“Whatever our differences, our two continents share the same heritage, the same values and above all the same purpose, to promote peace and prosperity through freedom, democracy and the rule of law, and to those objectives we will remain committed.”

The statement contrasted Trump’s previous comments about the EU, which the president described as “basically a vehicle for Germany”. Trump has also been a vocal Brexit supporter, saying the UK was “so smart in getting out”, and that “others will leave” as well.

Pence also addressed concerns over the new administration’s commitment to NATO defence pact, which Trump recently described as “obsolete”. While the US maintained “unwavering” support for the alliance, Pence said NATO members still had to meet the 2 per cent defence spending target as soon as possible.

“America will do our part, but Europe’s defence requires Europe’s commitment as well as ours,” said Pence. “The president expects real progress by the end of 2017… the patience of the American people will not endure forever.”

National: Liberal’s WA Preference Deal with One Nation Questioned

The Liberal party faced questions as its state division preferenced One Nation ahead of the National party for the Western Australia election. Other state divisions, such as Queensland, are reportedly considering to follow suit.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull defended the party’s decision on Monday, saying One Nation is not “a single issue party or a single personality party”.

“It is a substantial crossbench party in the Senate and it is taking a policy position on a wide range of issues,” Turnbull said.

“It is not a single issue party or a single personality party. We deal with it constructively and respectfully because we respect the fact that each of those One Nation senators has been democratically elected.”

Turnbull also added that preference deals were up to individual Liberal state divisions.

The Liberal party has denounced Pauline Hanson’s party multiple times in the past. In 2001, then Liberal prime minister John Howard said One Nation should be preferenced last in Liberal how-to-vote card due to the party’s racism. Before the 2016 election, Turnbull said, “Pauline Hanson is, as far as we are concerned, not a welcome presence on the Australian political scene. You’ve got to remember she was chucked out of the Liberal Party.”

Leader of the National party and Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce said Turnbull’s decision was “disappointing”, and warned Turnbull not to stray from the Liberal-National alliance.

“We won’t, but it could easily be that the National Party could stand in every Lower House seat in Perth and preference another party. What would that mean? You’d lose a heap of seats, simple as that,” said Joyce.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has criticised the Liberal party’s preference deal with One Nation, saying it is a desperate move from a party that has condemned Pauline Hanson and her group in the past.

Shorten said he had advised Labor party to preference One Nation last for the next federal election. “It’s clear to me that One Nation’s political agenda clashes with Labor values,” said Shorten in a statement to his party. “Labor believes in an Australia where no-one is limited by their faith, their race, by where they were born or who they love. That’s not the Australia of the One Nation party… In the Labor Party, we choose what we stand for – and it’s not fear, division or the politics of ‘us vs them’.”

International: Photo of Turkish Assassin Wins World Press Photo of the Year

Associated Press photographer Burhan Ozbilici has won Photo of the Year at the 2017 World Press Photo awards for his image of an off-duty Turkish policeman standing over a Russian ambassador whom he just shot.

The picture of gunman Mevlut Mert Altintas and ambassador Andrei Karlov, which was taken in December, was controversial among jury members. The awards’ jury chair, Stuart Franklin voted against the photo, saying it was “morally as problematic to publish as a terrorist beheading”.

“It was a very very difficult decision, but in the end we felt that the picture of the year was an explosive image that really spoke to the hatred of our times,” member of the jury Mary F Calvert said.

“Every time it came on the screen you almost had to move back because it’s such an explosive image and we really felt that it epitomises the definition of what the World Press Photo of the Year is and means.”

Ozbilici’s picture was chosen among 80,408 photos submitted to the competition by 5,034 photographers from 125 countries.

Ozbilici said upon receiving his award, “I immediately decided to do my job because I could be wounded, maybe die, but at least I have to represent good journalism.”

The jury awarded prizes in eight categories to 45 photographers from 25 countries, including USA’s Brent Stirton for his rhino poaching picture, France’s Laurent van der Stockt for his Mosul photo, and Russia’s Valery Melnikov for her long-term project Black Days of Ukraine.

National: Cory Bernardi Quits Liberal Party

Senator Cory Bernardi is set to resign from the Liberal Party to form his own “Australian Conservatives” party, despite calls from his colleagues to reconsider.

Bernardi called Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull at 7am Tuesday to confirm his resignation, and is expected to make a formal announcement at 12.30pm Tuesday.

“The point that Cory needs to reflect on is he is in the Parliament by virtue of the endorsement of the South Australian Liberal Party,” the Environment and Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg told Q&A on Monday. “He’s always been treated courteously within the Liberal Party and our party resembles that broad church of views.”

Liberal MP Craig Kelly said Bernadi should “have maybe one last think… You can do a lot more inside the Liberal party, working for, arguing those things that you believe in, than actually outside the tent.”

Immigration Minister Peter Dutton told ABC Radio that Bernardi’s resignation was a “betrayal of Liberal party values… We can most effectively defeat the Labor party at the next election if we’re united and we stick together as a party.”

Bernardi reportedly decided to form his own party after watching the anti-establishment trend in the US and Britain, as well as consulting with former prime minister Tony Abbott.

International: Israel Passes Bill to Legalise Settlement on Private Palestinian Lands

Israel’s parliament has passed a controversial bill that legalises the state’s settlement on lands owned privately by Palestinians in the West Bank.

The Regulation Bill, which was passed with a vote of 60 to 52, is set to protect Israeli settlement built “in good faith or at the state’s instruction” from court-ordered eviction and demolition.

The Palestine Liberation Organisation said the law proved that “the Israeli government’s will to destroy any chances for a political solution”, and that the “Israeli settlement enterprise negates peace and the possibility of the two-state solution.”

Anti-occupation organisation Peace Now has condemned the bill, saying it would “practically allow the government and private individuals to steal lands of Palestinians without any legal implications”.

Experts have warned that this law would violate property and human rights. Opposition lawmaker Tzipi Livni said the bill would lead the Israel Defense Forces to the International Criminal Court, while former justice minister Dan Meridor said the law would set an “evil and dangerous” precedent of Israeli government applying its sovereignty to the West Bank.

The state’s Attorney General, Avichai Mandelbilt also said the bill was unconstitutional and would lead to violation of international laws.

Days before the vote, the state’s defense minister Avigdor Lieberman said, “You don’t have to be a genius to understand that when the attorney general is opposed to the bill, this means that he is not willing to defend it in the High Court of Justice and that it is an unconstitutional bill, and its chances of being disqualified are 100 percent.”

The Morality Behind Background Checks

Background checks have always been a questionable and ethical procedure. There have been debates on whether or not a person’s criminal record should be an important requirement or a deal breaker for a potential employee. A person’s history can be a difficult quality to overlook but it is important to know your rights when applying for a federal police check.

  • What is a national police check? A national police check outlines an individual’s record of any criminal activity in Australia. Australian citizens and residents will usually need a check as a requirement. According to Seek, “it is a government service provided to either an individual or organisation for employment, voluntary work and occupation-related licensing or registration purposes.”
  • Why do employers need a police check? To reduce the risk of theft, fraud or other criminal activity performed by a potential new employee. With community services and industries where employees are working with children, the elderly or other vulnerable communities, police checks are vital for an organisation to rule out employing people who are past offenders.
  • Know your rights. Nothing happens without your consent regardless of whether you need a check for police investigation or prosecution purposes.
    During the procedure, you will need to confirm and sign a consensual form in order to release your criminal history for employment purposes.Seek says “In addition, if you’re asked in an interview whether you have a criminal record, according to the Human Rights Commission, you are not required to volunteer any information, unless there’s a requirement under legislation to do so. In this case, you would have to disclose your record.”

This article was sourced from: https://www.seek.com.au/career-advice/why-companies-require-police-checks-what-are-your-rights