International: Boko Haram Release Video Showing Some Of The Girls Kidnapped 2 Years Ago

Boko Haram has released a video showing fifty of the Chibok schoolgirls who were kidnapped two years ago.

Boko Haram
Source: Reuters

The video shows a man standing in front of the girls wearing a face mask and a turban and armed with a gun, demanding the Nigerian government for the release of Boko Haram fighters in return for the Chibok captives. “They should know that their children are still in our hands,” says the fighter in the video, which was posted on YouTube. “Don’t waste time – release our members in custody and we will release the girls.”

Bring Back Our Girls spokesman Abubakar Abdullahi confirmed that up to 10 girls from the video were indeed from Chibok.

In April 2014, 276 schoolchildren were taken from their dormitories at the Government Girls Secondary School in Chibok. 57 of them escaped, while 217 are still missing.

Boko Haram has been active for seven years in north-eastern Nigeria, and the group’s insurgency has led to the deaths of over 20,000 people and displaced over 2.3 million people.

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari vowed to take down Boko Haram when he won the elections in 2015. Buhari said in December 2015 that Nigeria has “technically won the war” against Boko Haram after the army took back large amounts of territory from the militant group. However, the government has yet to find the schoolgirls, suggesting the group’s lingering presence in the region.

National: Q&A Mitch Fifield says ‘Australia shares responsibility for Nauru’

Liberal frontbencher Mitch Fifield admits that Australia has a “shared responsibility” for the asylum seekers and refugees at Nauru detention centre in ABC show Q&A, Monday, August 22.

Fifield was responding to Tracey Donehue, a former teacher at Nauru Regional Processing Centre who asked about the responsibility of the Australian Government for asylum seekers, as witness accounts – including hers – of detainees’ mistreatments continue to be ignored.

Fifield suggested that the Federal Government has a responsibility to investigate incidents of abuse and assault on Nauru. “There wouldn’t be incident reports filed if they weren’t for the purpose of being investigated,” said Fifield.

Last month, government files leak revealed a wide range of abuse allegations, including assaults, sexual abuse, child abuse and poor living condition in the detention camp.

Liberal frontbencher and Immigration minister Peter Dutton said while the case would be investigated by Nauruan authorities, “some people do have a motivation to make a false complaint”.

“I have been made aware of some incidents that have reported false allegations of sexual assault because in the end, people have paid money to people smugglers and they want to come to our country,” Dutton told 2GB Radio.

“Some people have even gone to the extent of self-harming and people have self-immolated in an effort to get to Australia. Certainly, some have made false allegations.”

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the government will assess the information, while former immigration minister and current treasurer Scott Morrison claim the files should not be taken as fact. “It’s important to stress that incident reports of themselves aren’t a reporting of fact, they are reporting that an allegation has been made of a particular action,” Morrison said.